Caps
Scroll down to see them all, you should buy at least two.
9-1
Civilian cap, unlined wool cap typical of homemade cap just coming into style in the late 1850s, this style would be widely seen in the 1860s. Greenish tan wool and brown leather visor, size is about 23 1/2" and fits me very comfortably and I wear a slightly smaller size. The reluctant model wears an even smaller hat so the brim did not take the proper curve that it will when worn by somebody with a head that will fill the cap. (It will be a few more years until his melon is ripe but he is almost there) . I will smash this cap into a $5.00 flat rate box or envelop as it won't mind, as long as the leather can stay unbent the wool cap will look good as new after shipping across country or being crushed by the rest of your stuff when you pack for an event.  Wear it around town for a unique look  everyday.  So if you are tired of looking like a refugee from the 1840s and want to look a bit more up to date on fashion you can have this cap for the amazingly low price of $45 + $6 shipping smashed into a flat rate bag.
Paypal is the best way to pay for this cap and as always email me first.
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Cap introduction

The mid 19th century in the United States was a time of change.  Revolutions and famine in Europe caused an influx of immigration and much of it was poor. The industrial revolution and an increased urban population saw a movement from an apprentice master relationship to one of disposable workers. A new labor class living in a level of poverty not seen today in the US. Fashions responded by creating simpler and lower quality goods for the working class rather than the hand-me-downs from the wealthier master craftsman or used clothing purchased from the rag pickers. To meet the demand of a growing poor population new goods were cheaply made in factories, these low quality goods were what most people in the lower classes could afford. Forget tailoring, too expensive, fit was looser, (or too tight as it had to last even if you grew or the garment shrank) you even see pant legs rolled on adult men in the streets. Home made goods were of course the mainstay in the countryside but in the cities the new concept of jobs had man, woman and child working long hours just to afford food and shelter. little time was left for needlework. Sewing for many women among the urban poor had devolved to knowing how to do repairs rather than create whole garments and the shoddy goods they could afford took a lot of repairing.
  Cloth caps were an exception as they could be made at home for the boys and men of the household. They took only scraps of cloth and by pooling resources and skills a group of neighbors could make a batch of caps for their families. Leather brims were bought from the harness shop or cobbler who was happy to sell some scraps with his “boy” having the skill to cut and pre-punch the holes for sewing. Armed with a bag of brims and fabric scraps a group of women could have a cap making party and all the males in their families could cover their heads with the results. These were not professional hatter made quality caps as worn by the middle class and very far from the hunting and sporting caps worn by the wealthy during leisure pursuits. These were rough and practical caps, no sweatbands or linings and a short life expectancy among rough and tumble boys who were apt to pull off the brims.
    The caps here are of the working class urban poor, country boys wore hats, wealthy folks had high quality hats and caps with proper linings, sweatbands and better brims, they would also look better for longer, then and now those would be far more expensive. These caps are affordable and time period correct for the right impression. Urban poor are a universal, all cities had them and they were prime fodder for any army.
  Rich man’s war; poor man’s fight. Here are the caps the poor men wore.


CC-1 Sold
Wool wheel hat, common style of the late 50s and the 60s. This cap shows the smaller crown as was the newer fashion getting away from the very wide crown of the 40s.  The wheel hat dates back to at least the teens as a variation of the shako and survives today in some military caps, bus drivers, airline pilots and police.  Size7 1/2 more or less, being wool it has some give and will fit a range above and below the size stated, fits me comfortably and I wear a size 7 3/8
It can be on your head for only $45 + 6 shipping  smashed into a flat rate bag, you want it unsmashed it will be $10 shipping but it can handle the smashing and you will do worse packing up in the dark one night.
CC-5
This is a newer style cap and would soon appear in catalogs as a baseball or tennis cap. By the end of the century it will evolve into the newsboy cap and as fashion dictates will be larger and smaller crowned but always flatter than it was when it started. I like transitional forms of items that have elements of both before and after styles, this cap has that.
$45 + $6 shipping smashed into a flat rate bag. Size:  7 1/2  to 7 5/8, cotton so it has little give and I don't have the best method of sizing which is why I have given a range. This cap is suitable for a laborer, painter, plasterer, stable hand, some sort of work that is dirty or low paying (they usually go together).  The same look would in a short time be found in the leisure wear of the upper middle class and up for lawn tennis and croquet. those caps would be smaller and vary from the dome shape seen here to pill box caps. This does not have the star on the crown like CC-4 but a small circle at the top to finish the crown instead.
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CC-3
Cotton wheel hat, common style of the late 50s and the 60s. This cap shows the smaller crown as was the newer fashion getting away from the very wide crown of the 40s.  The wheel hat dates back to at least the teens as a variation of the shako and survives today in some military caps, bus drivers, airline pilots and police.  Size 7 3/8 more or less, being cotton it has little give but should fit a little over and under a 7 3/8. The colour is a dark reddish brown and the material is a twill weave..
It can be on your head for only $45 + 6 shipping  smashed into a flat rate bag, you want it unsmashed it will be $10 shipping but it can handle the smashing and you will do worse packing up in the dark one night.
9-1
9-1
CC-4 Sold
Based on the cap seen in EoG worn by Lt. Charlaron. This is a newer style cap and would soon appear in catalogs as a baseball cap. By the end of the century it will evolve into the newsboy cap and as fashion dictates will be larger and smaller crowned but always flatter than it was when it started. I like transitional forms of items that have elements of both before and after styles, this cap has that.  $45 plus $6 shipping smashed into a flat rate bag. Size is around 7 5/8 more or less, being cotton there isn't as much  wiggle room as wool, the main problem with wearing any of these too big is the brim will not take the proper curve and wearing one that is too small will give you a headache. The colour is black and the material is box weave much like canvas.

10-10
Based on the cap seen in EoG worn by Lt. Charlaron. This is a newer style cap and would soon appear in catalogs as a baseball cap. By the end of the century it will evolve into the newsboy cap and as fashion dictates will be larger and smaller crowned but always flatter than it was when it started. I like transitional forms of items that have elements of both before and after styles, this cap has that.  $45 plus $6 shipping smashed into a flat rate bag.
Size is around 7 3/4 more or less. This one is wool so there is a lot more stretch so it will fit a larger range, the main problem with wearing any of these too big is the brim will not take the proper curve and wearing one that is too small will give you a headache. The colour is black even if it looks charcoal in the photo.
CC-7
Wool wheel hat, common style of the late 50s and the 60s. This cap shows the smaller crown as was the newer fashion getting away from the very wide crown of the 40s.  The wheel hat dates back to at least the teens as a variation of the shako and survives today in some military caps, bus drivers, airline pilots and police.  Size7 3/8 more or less, being wool it has some give and will fit a range above and below the size stated.
It can be on your head for only $45 + 6 shipping  smashed into a flat rate bag, you want it unsmashed it will be $10 shipping but it can handle the smashing and you will do worse packing up in the dark one night.
CC-8 Sold
Wool wheel hat, common style of the late 50s and the 60s. This cap shows the smaller crown as was the newer fashion getting away from the very wide crown of the 40s.  The wheel hat dates back to at least the teens as a variation of the shako and survives today in some military caps, bus drivers, airline pilots and police.  Size7 3/8 more or less, being wool it has some give and will fit a range above and below the size stated.
  CC-7 and CC-8 are nearly the same but the visor is more vertical on CC-7.
It can be on your head for only $45 + 6 shipping  smashed into a flat rate bag, you want it unsmashed it will be $10 shipping but it can handle the smashing and you will do worse packing up in the dark one night.
The Store Bought Cap
Those without the ability to make their own or the means to not have to could buy caps of all qualities depending upon their level of wealth. A young man on his own with an entry level job would be shopping in the cheap stores while a successful professional engineer would be buying his cap at a much nicer location. Just as now when a "leather" baseball cap from Forever 21 costs $13 you can buy a cap that looks the same from Hermes for $730. People then were no different from today and bought what they could afford or felt they needed to afford to fit in with the social and professional circles in which they traveled. Store bought caps may be a step up from homemade or even a sideways step in the case of the cheaper end of the range in fact the materials in the cheap end might not even be as good as the homemade. 
CC-9
Cotton wheel hat, common style of the late 50s and the 60s. This is a "store bought" cap with construction details not common to the homemade caps. The partial sweatband (leather) is a feature found in 18th century caps and in late 19th and early 20th century caps, I have seen a painting from 1859 that shows this type of band in a felt hat being held by a field hand.  The wheel hat dates back to at least the teens as a variation of the shako and survives today in some military caps, bus drivers, airline pilots and police.  Size 7 1/2 - 7 5/8  more or less, being cotton it has little give.
It can be yours for only $90 + $7 shipping.
The photo doesn't show it very well but the cotton "chin strap" decoration has a thin red line in the center and looks very nice, the buttons are antique mother of pearl and are a matched pair.
CC-10
Cotton wheel hat, unusual style made in 8 panels. This is a "store bought" cap with construction details not common to the homemade caps. The partial sweatband (leather) is a feature found in 18th century caps and in late 19th and early 20th century caps, I have seen a painting from 1859 that shows this type of band in a felt hat being held by a field hand.  The wheel hat dates back to at least the teens as a variation of the shako and survives today in some military caps, bus drivers, airline pilots and police.  The 8 panel cap would in time become the 8/4 flat cap associated with Edwardian times and later, especially with news boys. It would be replaced by 6 panel caps to make them cheaper. This cap design was seen in a prewar photograph that I do not have the rights to publish. The lining is of a different pattern as this is how 8/4 caps are made, it helps to hold the round shape and cuts down on the bulky seams. Impossible to see in the photos and it may not even stay this way but there is a subtle difference in colour in alternating panels, it came from the same bolt of fabric so I assume it is some of it has had more exposure to light than the other so the colour may stay this way or even out, it is so slight that it will not show up in the images and in some light you can't see it but it is there.
Size 7 1/4 or so, being cotton it has little give, I wear a 7 3/8 hat and it fits a little tighter than I like but I don't like tight hats.
It can be yours for only $90 + $7 shipping.
The “chin strap” is like most civilian caps not a functional strap but it does serve the purpose of covering the stitching that holds on the brim, this one is shellacked leather and the buttons are some sort of metal that looks like pewter that I am not sure of the content, they are not lead based as they don't weigh much, I am sure it is what they call pewter in the jewelry trade today.
CC-11
Cotton wheel hat, unusual hybrid style made in 8 panels for the band and rise but a round flat top. This is a "store bought" cap with construction details not common to the homemade caps. The partial sweatband (leather) is a feature found in 18th century caps and in late 19th and early 20th century caps, I have seen a painting from 1859 that shows this type of band in a felt hat being held by a field hand.  The wheel hat dates back to at least the teens as a variation of the shako and survives today in some military caps, bus drivers, airline pilots and police.   This is a hybrid design that crosses two cap styles, makes for an interesting cap that I have not seen copied. This cap design was seen in a prewar photograph that I do not have the rights to publish. The lining is of a different pattern as this is how 8/4 caps are made, it helps to hold the round shape and cuts down on the bulky seams. The colour is a dark reddish brown and does not look like the images on my monitor so I have no clue how it looks on yours .
Size 7 1/8 or 7 ¼ , being cotton it does not have much stretch.
It can be yours for only $90 + $7 shipping.
The “chin strap” is like most civilian caps not a functional strap but it does serve the purpose of covering the stitching that holds on the brim, this one is fancy braid and the buttons are some sort of metal that looks like pewter that I am not sure of the content, they are not lead based as they don't weigh much, I am sure it is what they call pewter in the jewelry trade today.
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